NEW MATERIAL FROM READERS

Readers who have material that they are prepared to share on this site, should send it to me at prestonbirder@aol.com

This could take the form of family history details, stories relating to a property, or a photograph. All additions will be credited in the way you prescribe.

A new addition could benefit YOU! and vice versa; so, please keep it coming.

Follow by Email

Wednesday, 25 January 2012

ANCHOR INN, Anchor Court

ANCHOR INN
Anchor Court or Anchor Weind
*
MINE HOSTS:
1678 - 1681         Richard Woods
1699         ?         William Tomlinson  (The Anker, at the bottom of St. John's Weind) 
1732                    Edward Melling  (Owner: Edmund Entwistle  L.R.O. ref: CNP/3/1/11)
1807                    Robert Battersby
            CLOSED IN 1825 - COULD HAVE BEEN EARLIER THAN THIS.
*
There once was an ancient public house either in, or at the junction of Friargate and Cheapside.
Some of the information that I have on this inn seems to have suffered some confusion with the Blue Anchor on the other side of Market Place, where the Harris Museum now stands.
*
Mr. William Tomlinson, now tenant at the Anker,
that he caused the deep and dangerous middingsteed,
at the bottom of St. John's Weend, to be filled up
with earth, even with that Weend, before the 29thc
 of September next, otherwise we amerce him in
forty shillings.
Great Court Leet:  April 26th 1699
*
*
Bradford Observer  7th March 1844
*
Preston Chronicle  19th May 1855
NOTES:
Four-fifths of the way down the above article you will
note "the neighbouring 'Three Tuns' or 'Anchor '"
Although this could be construed as two different pubs,
I think that the reference here is to just one, with, perhaps,
the name "Three Tuns" preceding the "Anchor"
ThTheree were other 'Three Tuns' in the town, one on the corner of High Street and North Road, and later, one on North Road.
I can't see either one fitting into this context.
ALSO
Anchor, could actually be 'anker' - a pre-metric liquid measure used in Europe, including Holland, a nation with whom Preston had a lot of connections. An anker was the equivalent of 8.5 gallons.
'Tun' or 'Tuns' was also a measure for liquids, this time containing 252 wine gallons.
ALSO
 A 'Lauter Tun' and a 'Mash Tun' were both vessels used in brewing.
*
NOTES:-

*

*

*
He (Woods) had also been fined on April 9th 1678,
3s 4d by Preston Court Leet, for allowing his 
servants "to water horses in ye Buckett at ye well
in ye Market Place, to ye great prjdice of his neighbours."
*

No comments:

Post a Comment